District DD3

Physical Address: 6 Lancaster Road, Actonville, Benoni
GPS co-ordinates: 26°12′30.19″ S, 28°19′00.48″ E

Benoni Waste Water Treatment Works

The Benoni WWTW is situated within the DD3 drainage district. Built in 1935 and upgraded on several occasions over a period of time, the works is designed to treat 16 megalitres of industrial and domestic wastewater per day from the Actonville, Apex and Benoni central areas. Conventional biological filtration is employed as the main treatment process.

A central inlet works, incorporating the processes of screening and grit removal, serves the plant. The biological filtration process includes primary sedimentation, biological filtration and humus clarification. The humus tank effluent is finally treated to chemically remove ortho-phosphate and chlorinated before discharging it into the Amato Pan. A portion of the final effluent is used by various industries as cooling water. In the dry winter months, final effluent is supplied to the Korsman Bird Sanctuary. The Amato Pan overflows into a tributary of the Blesbokspruit.

Capacity: 16 Mℓ/d
Technology: Biofilter
Plant Classification: Class C
Areas Generating: Benoni

Physical Address: Parkland Drive, Esther Park, Kempton Park
GPS Co-ordinates: 26°06′02.43″ S, 28°10′57.80″ E

Esther Park Waste Water Treatment Works

The Esther Park WWTW is situated in Kempton Park, in the DD3 drainage district. It is the smallest of ERWAT’s 19 wastewater care works with an original capacity of 0,4 Mℓ/d. It was built in 1979 and is situated adjacent to the Esther Park residential area. This conventional activated sludge process was initially designed for only carbon and nitrogen reduction and therefore requires chemical addition for phosphate removal. The plant was upgraded to 1.0 ML/day by the addition of one final settling tank in 2013. Treated effluent flows into the Modderspruit and eventually into the Jukskei River drainage district in quaternary catchment A21C.

Capacity: 1 Mℓ/d
Technology: BNR
Plant Classification: D
Areas Generating: Esther Park

Physical Address: R25 (Bapsfontein/Hartebeestfontein)
GPS Co-ordinates: 26°01′11.58”S, 28°17′04.80”E

Hartebeestfontein Waste Water Treatment Works

The WWTW was built in 1977 and receives effluent from industries in Spartan and Isando as well as households in the Kempton Park area.

The Hartebeestfontein WWTW original design differed from the traditional activated sludge works in that it utilised a two-stage, two-culture activated sludge process. Each stage is a complete processing unit comprising of aeration, clarification and sludge return. The primary stage is aimed principally at COD (Chemical Oxygen Demand) removal and the secondary stage for nitrification. The initial configuration comprised of three 10 Mℓ/d treatment modules totalling 30 Mℓ/d.

In 1986 a side-stream Phostrip (biological phosphate removal) plant was retrofitted. This was followed by the addition of a third inlet works module in 1992 and a single 15 Mℓ/d treatment works resulting in a total treatment capacity of 45 Mℓ/d. The works was recently refurbished at a cost of R65 million, including the building of a new balancing dam and the increase of reactor volume and aeration capacity.

In 1995 a tertiary treatment system was designed and implemented to handle chemical dosing to ensure an even more effective phosphate removal process. In 2014 the plant capacity was increased to 50 Mℓ/d by modifying module 4 and currently treats 63 Mℓ/d by the addition of two Final Settling Tanks. Each module consists of one primary settling tank, one activated sludge reactor and two final settling tanks. The aerobic reactor is divided into two zones with the first zone being fine bubble diffused aeration and the second zone surface aeration.

Effluent from the Hartebeestfontein works flows via the Swartspruit to the Rietspruit in quaternary catchment A21A. Bio-solids treated from the 9 x 2 m³ anaerobic digesters are applied to land and ploughed in.

Capacity: 63 Mℓ/d
Technology: BNR
Plant Classification: B
Areas Generating: Kempton Park

Physical Address: Keramiek Road, Olifantsfontein
GPS Co-ordinates: 25°56′24.48″ S, 28°12′57.96″ E

Olifantsfontein Waste Water Treatment Works

The Olifantsfontein works, situated in the northern Drainage District (DD3), serves the majority of the communities and industries in Tembisa, Olifantsfontein and Ivory Park, as well as sections of Kempton Park and Midrand. It is designed to treat some 105 megalitres of wastewater per day.

The original phase 1 of the works, based on the conventional biological filtration process, was built in 1972 to treat an inflow of 4.5 Mℓ/d. The works was expanded in 1976 to a treatment capacity of 9 Mℓ/d.

An increase in flow and loading resulted in a further expansion (phase 2) to a capacity of 38 Mℓ/d in 1985, based on an integrated biological filtration and activated sludge process. The economic and industrial growth in the district resulted in the construction and commissioning of the 70 Mℓ/d phase 3 extension by ERWAT in 1995, equipped with a semi-automatic process control via a Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) system.

The phase 3 works consists of a mirrored system, with two identical 35 Mℓ/d. Biological Nutrient Removal (BNR) process units, incorporating common preliminary and tertiary treatment units. The preliminary treatment includes screening in three sets and degritting in three vortex degritters, as well as automated screenings dewatering and grit classification. After flow measurement and division, primary treatment takes place in two in-line prefermenter primary settling tanks (36 m diameter). The settled sewage is treated in two 25000 m3 BNR reactors, designed as 3rd stage Bardenpho configurations, with flexibility to allow custom processes such as the University of Cape Town (UCT) or Modified UCT arrangements. A standby chemical phosphate removal dosing system is available to ensure nutrient removal can be accomplished continuously. Each reactor contains eight mixers (11 kW) and sixteen dual speed surface aerators (110 kW). Biomass settling, recirculation and final clarification take place in four secondary settling tanks (38 m diameter). Final effluent chlorination takes place in a flash mixer, after which a 3-leg contact basin (2200 m3) provides the required disinfection contact time. The disinfected effluent discharges into the Kaalspruit in quaternary catchment A21B which eventually flows to the Hartebeestpoort Dam.

Primary sludge is treated in four 2750 m3 anaerobic digesters before dewatering. Waste activated sludge is thickened in two Dissolved Air Flotation (DAF) units, before it is combined with the digested primary sludge for conditioning and final dewatering in three Filter Belt Presses (FBP). The dewatered sludge is used for agricultural land application.

The works is designed to contain and recover all waste liquid process water on-site, with a network of internal recirculation systems to allow for retreatment.

Capacity: 105 Mℓ/d
Technology: BNR and Biofilters
Plant Classification: A
Areas Generating: Tembisa, Clayville, Ivory Park

Physical Address: 69 Sarel Cilliers Street, Rynfield, Benoni
GPS Co-ordinates: 26°09′31.05″ S, 28°21′21.41″ E

Rynfield Wastewater Treatment Works

The Rynfield WWTW is situated south-west of the Van Ryn Dam in Benoni and falls within the DD5 area. Built in 1969 and extended in 1979, it is designed to treat 13 Mℓ/d of raw sewage from the Benoni, Cloverdene and Rynfield areas. Both biological filtration and activated sludge are employed as treatment processes.

A central inlet works, incorporating the processes of screening and grit removal serves the works. The older biological filtration module includes primary sedimentation, biological filtration and humus clarification. The BNR activated sludge module consist of a 5 stage reactor basin and final clarification. The final effluent is chlorinated before discharging it into a tributary of the Blesbokspruit.

Capacity: 13 Mℓ/d
Technology: Biofilter and BNR
Plant Classification: Class B
Areas Generating: Rynfield

District DD5

Physical Address: Ermelo Road, Strubenvale, Springs
GPS Co-ordinates: 26°16′08.45″ S, 28°29′00.15″ E

Ancor Wastewater Treatment Works

The Ancor WWTW is situated in Springs and falls within the DD5 drainage district. Built in 1936 and upgraded on several occasions over a period of time, the works is designed to treat 15 megalitres of wastewater per day from the Springs and Kwa Thema areas. Conventional biological filtration is employed as the main treatment process.

A central inlet works, incorporating the process of screening and grit removal, serves the works. The biological filtration processes include primary clarification, biological filtration and humus clarification. The biofilter effluent is treated to chemically remove ortho-phosphate and a portion of the humus tank effluent is pumped to a local industry for re-use. The final effluent is chlorinated before discharging it into a tributary of the Blesbokspruit

Capacity: 15 Mℓ/d
Technology: Biofilter
Plant Classification: C
Areas Generating: Springs, Casseldale, New Era, Nuffield, Kwa-Thema, Daggafontein extensions, Strubenvale, Edelweiss

Physical Address: Vorsterkroon, Nigel
GPS Co-ordinates: 26°23′17.69″ S, 28°28′28.00″ E

Carl Grundling Wastewater Treatment Works

The Carl Grundlingh WWTW is situated north of Nigel and falls within the DD5 drainage district. The works was built in 1977 and upgraded in 1984. It is designed to treat 5 Mℓ/day raw sewage from the Dunnottar, Sharon Park and Marievale areas. Activated sludge is employed as the main treatment process.

A central inlet works, incorporating the processes of screening, grit removal and flow measurement serves the works. The activated sludge process includes anaerobic/anoxic zones followed by an aerated Pasveer ditch reactor and final clarification. The final effluent is chlorinated before re-use and discharging it into the Nigel Dam. The outflow of the dam flows into the Blesbokspruit.

Capacity: 5 Mℓ/d
Technology: Activated Sludge
Plant Classification: C
Areas Generating: Sharon Park, Marievale, Dunnottar

Physical Address: Plot 4, Holfontein Road, Etwawa Ext 1, Benoni
GPS Co-ordinates: 26°08′08.72″ S, 28°27′49.20″ E

Daveyton Wastewater Treatment Works

The Daveyton works is located 5km from Daveyton town in the DD5 drainage district. Built in 1958, and upgraded several times over a period of time, the works is designed to treat 19 Mℓ/d of raw sewage from the Etwatwa areas.

A central inlet works, incorporating the process of screening and grit removal serves the plant. The activated sludge process includes a conventional BNR three stage reactor basin and final clarification. The final effluent is chlorinated before discharging it into the Blesbokspruit.

Capacity: 19 Mℓ/d
Technology: BNR
Plant Classification: C
Areas Generating: Etwatwa

Physical Address: Farm Bosch Hoek 385, Vaaldam Road, Heidelberg
GPS Co-ordinates: 26°32′22.59″ S, 28°19′48.93″ E

Heidelberg Wastewater Treatment Works

The Heidelberg WWTW is situated south of Heidelberg and falls within the DD5 drainage district. Built in 1963, and upgraded and extended on several occasions over a period of time, the designed capacity of the works is 5.4 Mℓ/d of industrial effluent and raw sewage from the Heidelberg areas. Activated sludge is employed as the main treatment process.

A central inlet works, incorporating the process of screening and grit removal, serves the works. The activated sludge process includes primary sedimentation, a three stage BNR activated sludge reactor basin and final clarification. The final effluent is chlorinated before it is discharged into the Blesbokspruit.

Capacity: 5.4 Mℓ/d
Technology: Activated Sludge
Plant Classification: C
Areas Generating: Heidelberg, Rensberg, Overkruin, Jordaan Park, Shalimar Ridge, Bergsig, Extension 23 & Extension 26

Physical Address: Heidelberg Road, Plot 14, Maraisdrift, Nigel
GPS Co-ordinates: 26°26′40.37″ S, 28°26′46.89″ E

Herbert Bickley Wastewater Treatment Works

The Herbert Bickley WWTW is situated south of Nigel town and falls within the DD5 drainage district. Built in 1948, and upgraded and extended on several occasions over a period of time, the works is designed to treat 15.1 Mℓ/d of industrial effluent and raw sewage from the Nigel, Duduza, Alra Park, Mackenzieville and Jameson Park areas. Both biological filtration and activated sludge are employed as treatment processes.

A central inlet works, incorporating the processes of screening and grit removal serves the works. The older biological filtration module includes primary sedimentation and biological filtration. The effluent is pumped to the activated sludge module for further treatment. The BNR activated sludge module includes a conventional 3 stage reactor basin and final clarification. The effluent is finally chlorinated before discharging it into the Blesbokspruit. A portion of the final effluent is utilised by the Nigel Correctional Services facility for irrigation purposes.

Capacity: 15.1 Mℓ/d
Technology: Biofilter and Activated Sludge
Plant Classification: B
Areas Generating: Nigel central, Alra Park, Mckenzieville, Visagie Park, Duduza, Jameson Park

Physical Address: Corner Escombe and Wanderers Street, Brakpan
GPS Co-ordinates: 26°13’24.45’’S, 28 22’33.01’’E

Jan Smuts Wastewater Treatment Works

The Jan Smuts WWTW is situated in Brakpan and falls within the DD5 drainage district. It was built in 1938 and upgraded and extended on several occasions over a period of time. The design capacity of the works is 6.1 Mℓ/d for effluent from the Brakpan, Dalview, Dalpark and Vulcania areas. Conventional biological filtration is employed as the main treatment process.

A central inlet works incorporating the processes of screening and grit removal serves the works. The biological filtration process includes primary sedimentation, biological filtration and humus clarification. The effluent from the biological trickling filters is treated chemically to remove ortho-phosphate through the humus tanks and the humus tank effluent is filtered through the mechanical disc filtration unit (Tertiary Filtration Unit – TFU). The final effluent is chlorinated before discharging it into the Jan Smuts Dam. The outflow of the dam flows into the Blesbokspruit.

Capacity: 6 Mℓ/d
Technology: Biofilter
Plant Classification: C
Areas Generating: Brakpan central, Anzac, Eastern half of Dalview, South east half of Brakpan North, Section of Kenleaf

Physical Address: Corner of N12/Kingsway Road, Benoni
GPS Co-ordinates: 26°10′13.46″ S, 28°23′49.21″ E

JP Marais Wastewater Treatment Works

The JP Marais WWTW is situated in Benoni and falls within the DD5 drainage district. Built in 1991, the plant is designed to treat 15 Mℓ/d of industrial effluent and raw sewage from the Benoni, Boksburg, Daveyton and Modderbee areas. The Modderbee Correctional Services project was discontinued and the facility moved to the new area. Conventional activated sludge is employed as the main sewage purification process.

A central inlet works, incorporating the process of screening and grit removal serves the works. The BNR activated sludge process includes primary sedimentation, a three stage Badenpho reactor basin and final clarification. The final effluent is chlorinated and discharged into a tributary of the Blesbokspruit.

Capacity: 15 Mℓ/d
Technology: Activated Sludge
Plant Classification: C
Areas Generating: Benoni, Daveyton, Modderbee

Physical Address: 1 Carnation Road, Welgedacht Agricultural Holdings, Springs
GPS Co-ordinates: 26°11′29.18″ S, 28°28′26.86″ E

Welgedcht Wastewater Treatment Works

The Welgedacht WWTW is situated in the DD5 area with a design capacity of 95 Mℓ/d which utilizes activated sludge processes to treat its influent, which is 20% industrial and 80% domestic. Welgedacht has two modules; Module 1 which is a 35 Mℓ/d Surface Aeration plant and Module 2 which is a 60 Mℓ/d Diffused Air Aeration plant.
Each module has its own inlet works which comprises of screening system and degritting systems. The process comprises the following stages: Three sets of Archimedean screw pumps lift the raw water into the inlet works in two stages. Two coarse screens followed by two automatic fine screens and screw compactor are used to remove rags from the influent. Grit is removed in two degritters.

The Reactor (Module 1) utilises a 5 stage Phoredox process configuration, with the following zones: anaerobic anoxic, aerobic, second anoxic followed by re-aeration. Aeration is by 16 surface mounted aerators and mixing by 13 submersible mixers. Effluent from the reactor flows into three parallel biological clarifiers from which the underflow is recycled back to the anaerobic zone of the reactor. Excess sludge is wasted from the underflow. The clarifiers overflow to three chemical clarifiers where ferric chloride is used for additional phosphate removal.

Module 2 is equipped with two balancing tanks to equalize diurnal flow patterns. It also has primary sedimentation tanks, and settled wastewater is treated in their respective bioreactors. Secondary sedimentation is employed for all modules to separate the activated sludge from the liquid. The treated effluent from Module 2 goes through sand filters before disinfection whereas those from module 1 goes straight to disinfection after secondary sedimentation. The effluent from both modules are combined and discharged within the Blesbokspruit stream.

The sludge handling facilities comprises of 2 heated and mixed primary anaerobic digesters and 3 belt presses. The primary sludge is first screened and pumped to the two primary anaerobic digesters. The heating system of the digester comprises of a boiler and two heat exchangers, one per digester. These are used to heat and keep the temperature within the digester to acceptable levels. When the digesters fill up, sludge is sent to the sludge holding tank through gravity. At that point, digested sludge can either be sent to de-watering facility for further processing or to land for disposal. The gas produced in this system is sent to the Gas Holding Tank for storage, from the Gas Holding Tank it can be sent to Boiler or the Flare for burning.

Capacity: 95 Mℓ/d
Technology: Activated Sludge
Plant Classification: A
Areas Generating: Benoni, Daveyton, Bakerton, Petersfield, Gugulethu, Slovo Park

Physical Address: Farm Klipstapel, Vaaldam Road, Ratanda
GPS Co-ordinates: 26°34′57.80″ S, 28°18′11.27″ E

Ratanda Wastewater Treatment Works

The Ratanda WWTW is situated south-west of Ratanda town and falls within the DD5 district. Built in 1998, it is designed to treat 4.7 Mℓ/d of raw sewage from Ratanda. Conventional activated sludge is employed as the main treatment process.

A central inlet works, incorporating the processes of screening and grit removal, serves the works. The activated sludge process includes a conventional three stage BNR reactor basin and final clarification. The final effluent is chlorinated and discharged into the Blesbokspruit.

Capacity: 4.7 Mℓ/d
Technology: Activated Sludge
Plant Classification: C
Areas Generating: Ratanda, Obed Nkosi Phase 1

Physical address: Corner Modjadji and Khama Street, Tsakane, Brakpan
GPS Co-ordinates: 26°22′31.93″ S, 28°21′58.20″ E

Tsakane Wastewater Treatment Works

Tsakane WWTW was initially designed with a treatment capacity of 10.8 Mℓ/d in 1975. A central inlet works, incorporating the process of screening and grit removal serves the works.
HYBACS Technology (SMART UNITS) was added during 2017 to expand the capacity of the plant to 20 Ml/d ADWF.
HYBACS comprises of two biological stages: a unique attached growth reactor referred to as a SMART TM unit, and a BNR activated sludge reactor. The subsequent process is clarification (or another solids separation technique) and, crucially, some or all of the return activated sludge (RAS) is recycled to the SMART TM unit.
After the BNR follows the final clarification stage. The final effluent is chlorinated before discharging into a tributary of the Blesbokspruit.

Capacity: 20 Mℓ/d
Technology: Hybrid Activated Sludge
Plant Classification: C
Areas Generating: Greater Tsakane

District DD6

Physical Address: 536 Sontonga Street, Motsamai Section, Katlehong
GPS Co-ordinates: 26°20′39.40″ S, 28°10′01.31″ E or 26°19′36.94″ S, 28°09′48.25″ E

Dekema Wastewater Treatment Works

The Dekema works is situated in Katlehong and falls within the DD6 drainage district. It was built in 1936 with a capacity of 36 Mℓ/d. It receives its raw sewage from parts of Germiston, Alberton and Katlehong. Conventional biological filtration is employed and it consists of 8 sections.

A central inlet works, incorporating the process of screening and grit removal serves the plant. Some of the screened, degritted sewage is bypassed to the nearby Waterval WWTW. The remainder of the flow is treated in the biological filtration processes that include primary clarification, biological filtraters and humus clarification. The effluent is treated chemically to remove ortho-phosphate before discharging it into the Natalspruit. Sludge derived from the treatment process is applied to surrounding land and ploughed into the soil.

Capacity: 36 Mℓ/d
Technology: Biofilter
Plant Classification: B
Areas Generating: Alberton, Germiston, Kathlehong

Physical Address: Corner Kalk/Van Dyk Roads, Rondebult
GPS Co-ordinates: 26°17′57.92″ S, 28°13′37.82″ E

Rondebult Wastewater Treatment Works

Rondebult WWTW is situated in Germiston and falls within the DD6 drainage district. It was built in 1937 and currently has a capacity of 36 Mℓ/d. The works receives raw sewage from Germiston and Boksburg. Rondebult consists of two modules, implementing both biological filters and an activated sludge process to treat a combination of domestic and industrial sewage. The carbonaceous loading from the industries is particularly high and an activated sludge process was retrofitted to relieve the carbonaceous load on the biological filters treatment.

A central inlet works, incorporating screening and grit removal serves the plant. The biological filtration process includes primary sedimentation, primary biological filtration for carbonaceous removal, and secondary biological filtration for nitrification and humus clarification. The biological filters are all covered and fitted with blowers to provide for forced aeration. The combined effluent from the activated sludge reactor and biological filtration process is treated chemically to remove ortho-phosphorous and chlorinated before it flows through a series of maturation ponds.

Over the years a dense stand of reeds developed in these ponds, which attracted numerous numbers of species of waterfowl. This led to the establishment of the internationally known Rondebult Bird Sanctuary. Effluent from these ponds is discharged to a tributary of the Natalspruit, which eventually flows into the Klip River. Solid waste produced in the various processes on the works is stabilised in anaerobic digesters, from where it is disposed of on 70ha of land. The land is used to cultivate fodder.

Capacity: 36 Mℓ/d
Technology: Biofilter
Plant Classification: B
Areas Generating: Germiston, Rondebult, Boksburg

Physical Address: Corner Brickfield/Bierman Streets, Vosloorus
GPS Co-ordinates: 26°20′47.85″ S, 28°10′55.11″ E

Vlakplaats Wastewater Treatment Works

Vlakplaats is situated in Vosloorus and falls within the DD6 drainage district. The original WWTW was built in 1972, but soon after that the need for extension was identified. Three more modules followed in 1974, 1983 and 1991 respectively. The WWTW has a designed capacity of 83 megaliters per day. The works presently treats effluent from Boksburg and Vosloorus as well as areas of Tsakane, Duduza and Brakpan. The first three modules are conventional biological filters while the fourth module is an activated sludge reactor designed for biological nutrient removal.

The flow is divided to each of the four modules. Each of the biological filtration processes includes manually operated screens and facilities for grit removal. It also includes primary sedimentation, biological filtration and humus clarification. The effluent from each of the three modules is dosed with ferric chloride for chemical phosphorous removal before it is discharged into a system of maturation ponds.

The activated sludge module consists of mechanical screens and grit removal equipment. It also includes primary sedimentation, in-line flow balancing, a three-stage Bardenpho activated sludge reactor and secondary clarification. The effluent from all four modules flows through the maturation ponds into the Natalspruit and finally into the Klip River. All the sludge, including the thickened activated sludge, is stabilised in mixed, heated digesters from where it is applied on drying beds or on land. Local farmers cultivate instant lawn, utilizing some of the dried sludge.

Capacity: 83 Mℓ/d
Technology: Biofilter and Activated Sludge
Plant Classification: A
Areas Generating: Boksburg, Springs, Vosloorus, Brakpan (portions), Kwa Thema, Tsakane, Benoni (portions) ludge.

Physical Address: 1 Eike Road, Klip River
GPS Co-ordinates: 26°26′14.12″ S, 28°06′03.55″ E

Waterval Wastewater Treatment Works

The Waterval WWTW is the biggest works operated by ERWAT and is situated in the DD6 area at the Klip River.

The first 25 Mℓ/d Module at Waterval WWTW was commissioned in 1979 and subsequently modified to treat 30 Mℓ/d. Upgrades in 1989 and 1993 each added further 35 Mℓ/d capacity modules. An upgrade during 2000/2001 included a new inlet works comprising screens, vortex degritters, stormflow and sub-standard effluent containment measures.

The plant was originally built to serve parts of Germiston, Alberton, Kathlehong, Vosloorus and Boksburg. Due to continued and rapid growth in the southern area of Ekurhuleni, it became crucial to make provision for additional capacity at this regional wastewater treatment works.

Further extensions involved the building of a fourth activated sludge module at a cost of R170 million. The module was commissioned in 2008. The existing plant consists of a modern preliminary treatment facility, four parallel liquid biological treatment modules and tertiary disinfection before the final effluent is discharged into the Klip River.

The total design capacity of the Waterval wastewater care works is now 170 Mℓ/d.

Capacity: 170 Mℓ/d
Technology: Activated Sludge
Plant Classification: A
Areas Generating: Alberton, Germiston, Tokoza, excess flow from 3 other plants in DD6